Thought Leadership Resources

book5Thought Leadership Resources

Sign up for our free weekly newsletter, with practical steps on how to build your profile. As a bonus, receive our free e-book about designing thought leadership content.
sign1

Get your ideas into media already trusted by the people you want as clients,” is one of the central themes of this blog. Rather than just trusting to Google to drive potential clients towards your own website, it makes sense to fish where the fish are.

Read more

Should you be putting more work into getting speaking engagements to build your personal profile as an expert in your field? Just maybe. Consider:

Potential clients get to see what you’re like as a person
You can interact with people from the stage, building a relationship with them
People at the event have more respect for what you say even in ordinary conversations, because you’re wearing that “Speaker” badge (It works! Really!!)
It looks good on social media, on your CV and on your LinkedIn profile

Read more

 As I pointed out in Post #55, you need to create content that engages and interests clients, not just you. Particularly, this involves creating content that has them and their interests at heart.

Read more

If you’re like many of the business professionals I work with, you have a pressing need to build strong relationships with your clients, so you can get more repeat engagements without having to constantly hunt out new clients.

One way to do that is through standing out as offering something extra.

Read more

Suddenly, podcasting is hot. It’s taken a combination of smartphones that can download online files easily, earbuds and noise-canceling headphones, easy-to-use recording hardware and software – and not the least, places like iTunes and Stitcher to make one’s podcast findable online. But podcasting has moved from geeky to cool, when it comes to getting your ideas in front of potential clients.

Read more

Do you offer services that can be filled by other business professionals? Almost certainly, yes. If your service is so narrow that there’s no competition, there’s probably not much of a market for it either.

So how do you give clients a reason to choose you over a competitor? The procedures you follow may be the same – and may actually be dictated by regulations or professional practice. Your pricing is about the same. So how do you stand out, and also avoid a race to the bottom regarding your fees?

Read more

Why do you divert time from other uses (like sleep, or billable work …) to create blog posts, prepare and present speeches, as well as write articles for publication? I’d say that this activity has just one purpose. It’s to help you get noticed and stand out, so you can get more of the work you want to do, become the preferred choice in your field, and earn more.

Given that focus, wouldn’t you want those blog posts, speeches, articles and other content to be as effective as they can be?

Read more

There’s a story of a visitor to a rock quarry in mediaeval Europe. The visitor asks one stonemason, “What are you doing?” and the mason replies, “I’m chipping flakes off this stone.” A second mason replies to the same question, “I’m cutting stone into square blocks.” But the third mason says, “I’m building a cathedral.”

Read more

How do you gauge the effectiveness of a presentation you’ve given? Some people might say it was a success if they got through the whole event without an anxiety attack, or if they finished on time, or if they got through all the points they planned to cover. They might say it was a success if there were a lot of people in the audience.

Read more

In this newsletter, I’ve so far avoided the topic of blogging – even though this newsletter is really a blog. And not that I’m bragging (well, I suppose I am), this blog has now been publishing for a year, which is some kind of a gauge of success. The number of subscribers keeps on climbing, unsubscribes remain low, and metrics indicate a pretty high “open” rate.

Read more

Once upon a time in America, if an event didn’t get covered on the six o’clock news of CBS, NBC or ABC, it was like it didn’t happen. There were “major news media,” and there were those that didn’t matter.

In a business context too, there were major media like Fortune and the Wall Street Journal, as well as specialty publications like Engineering News Record – titans that stood like gatekeepers, between “sources” with expertise to offer, and the readers of those publications.

Read more

Some of the technical professionals I’ve worked with don’t think much of marketing. “My work speaks for itself,” they say. “Do good work, build your reputation, and clients will find you.” A number of the people who’ve told me this take an understandable pride in having built a practice and a reputation that brings in repeat work and referrals.

Read more